Have I Told You Today I Love You?

Living out my dad's dream to dream.

Another short film to watch.

This 2 and a half minute short starring Kirsten Dunst as herself has something to say about our obsession with celebrity and social media.

A wonderful & interesting short animated film.

Interesting tidbit.

"Kazi drives a Toyota Prius for Uber in Los Angeles. He hates it. He barely makes minimum wage, and his back hurts after long shifts. But every time a passenger asks what it’s like working for Uber, he lies: “It’s like owning my own business; I love it.” Kazi lies because his job depends on it. After passengers finish a ride, Uber asks them to rate their driver on a scale from one to five stars. Drivers with an average below 4.7 can be deactivated — tech-speak for fired.
In fact, if you ask Uber drivers off the clock what they think of the company, it often gets ugly fast. …In LA, San Francisco, Seattle, and New York, tension between drivers and management has bubbled over in recent months. And even though Uber’s business model discourages collective action (each worker is technically in competition with each other), some drivers are banding together.”
“It won’t be easy. Drivers are going up against a burgeoning goliath valued at around $18 billion. The company just hired David Plouffe, who managed Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns; it’s active in 130 cities; and if company executives are to be believed, it doubles its revenue every six months.”
“They think we are a bunch of losers who can’t find better jobs,” DeWolf said. “That’s why they treat us like robots — like we are replaceable.”
Uber, of course, disputes this characterization. “Uber succeeds when our partner-drivers succeed,” Behrend said.
But that is just empty spin: drivers aren’t partners — they are laborers exploited by their company. They have no say in business decisions and can be fired at any time. Instead of paying its employees a wage, Uber just pockets a portion of their earnings. Drivers take all the risks and front all the costs — the car, the gas, the insurance — yet it is executives and investors who get rich.
Uber is part of a new wave of corporations that make up what’s called the “sharing economy.” The premise is seductive in its simplicity: people have skills, and costumers want services. Silicon Valley plays matchmaker, churning out apps that pair workers with work. Now, anyone can rent out an apartment with AirBnB, become a cabbie through Uber, or clean houses using Homejoy.
But under the guise of innovation and progress, companies are stripping away worker protections, pushing down wages, and flouting government regulations. At its core, the sharing economy is a scheme to shift risk from companies to workers, discourage labor organizing, and ensure that capitalists can reap huge profits with low fixed costs.
There’s nothing innovative or new about this business model. Uber is just capitalism, in its most naked form.”
Against Sharing
art: Jeremey Mann

Interesting tidbit.

"Kazi drives a Toyota Prius for Uber in Los Angeles. He hates it. He barely makes minimum wage, and his back hurts after long shifts. But every time a passenger asks what it’s like working for Uber, he lies: “It’s like owning my own business; I love it.” Kazi lies because his job depends on it. After passengers finish a ride, Uber asks them to rate their driver on a scale from one to five stars. Drivers with an average below 4.7 can be deactivated — tech-speak for fired.

In fact, if you ask Uber drivers off the clock what they think of the company, it often gets ugly fast. …In LA, San Francisco, Seattle, and New York, tension between drivers and management has bubbled over in recent months. And even though Uber’s business model discourages collective action (each worker is technically in competition with each other), some drivers are banding together.”

It won’t be easy. Drivers are going up against a burgeoning goliath valued at around $18 billion. The company just hired David Plouffe, who managed Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns; it’s active in 130 cities; and if company executives are to be believed, it doubles its revenue every six months.”

“They think we are a bunch of losers who can’t find better jobs,” DeWolf said. “That’s why they treat us like robots — like we are replaceable.”

Uber, of course, disputes this characterization. “Uber succeeds when our partner-drivers succeed,” Behrend said.

But that is just empty spin: drivers aren’t partners — they are laborers exploited by their company. They have no say in business decisions and can be fired at any time. Instead of paying its employees a wage, Uber just pockets a portion of their earnings. Drivers take all the risks and front all the costs — the car, the gas, the insurance — yet it is executives and investors who get rich.

Uber is part of a new wave of corporations that make up what’s called the “sharing economy.” The premise is seductive in its simplicity: people have skills, and costumers want services. Silicon Valley plays matchmaker, churning out apps that pair workers with work. Now, anyone can rent out an apartment with AirBnB, become a cabbie through Uber, or clean houses using Homejoy.

But under the guise of innovation and progress, companies are stripping away worker protections, pushing down wages, and flouting government regulations. At its core, the sharing economy is a scheme to shift risk from companies to workers, discourage labor organizing, and ensure that capitalists can reap huge profits with low fixed costs.

There’s nothing innovative or new about this business model. Uber is just capitalism, in its most naked form.”

Against Sharing

art: Jeremey Mann

instagram:

Chasing Pop Visions and Cartoon Dreams with @alia_pop

For more whimsical portraits and fantasy stylings, follow @alia_pop on Instagram.

“I want to create a fantastic world of hypnotic color and classic dreaminess,” says LA-based artist, Alia Penner (@alia_pop). “I have painted on people, horses, bouncy castles and even a school bus.”

Bold patterns and colors are everywhere in Alia’s work, which ranges from high-profile fashion shoots to giant, painted Starbucks cups in Hollywood. But her Instagram account feels more like a special curation of the art she makes at home—a bright mishmash of celebrity face collages and quirky magazine cutouts.

“Just for fun, I started coloring in the New York Times every Sunday, using it sort of like a sketchbook. I added color to the iconic black and white images of starlets, then put them on Instagram,” she says. “They really popped.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Alia’s daily sources of inspiration are just as eclectic as her art: she lists balloons, polish movie posters, hand-tinted films and unopened paint cans, among others. At the end of the day, though, her job is about having fun.

“My favorite projects are the ones that feel like play from start to finish,” she says. “I’m a child at heart.”

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men & good women to do nothing.”

– Edmund Burke

“I don’t know why people are so reluctant to say they’re feminists. Could it be any more obvious that we still live in a patriarchal world when feminism is a bad word?”

– Ellen Page