Have I Told You Today I Love You?

Living out my dad's dream to dream.

“Vulnerability is the key to happiness. Vulnerable people are powerful people.”

Amy Poehler 

(via ucbcomedy)

Makes me miss Korea big time.

Exploring the Art at Gamcheon Culture Village (감천문화마을)

For more photos and videos of the village’s art, explore the 감천문화마을 (Gamcheon Culture Village) location page.

Gamcheon Culture Village (감천문화마을) in South Korea is a small village filled with art and history. Located on a mountainside in southern Busan, locals often compare the village’s view of dense buildings to Greece’s Santorini, Peru’s Machu Picchu and even Lego blocks for its shape and colorfulness. Inside the village, narrow alleys spread throughout the city like a maze where people are likely to run into multi-colored buildings, quirky art installations and stylish galleries.

The village, also called Taegukdo Village, was founded in 1918 when thousands of people, many of them followers of the Taegukdo religion, fled to the war-free area of Busan. As a village settled by war refugees, it existed as one of the poorest areas in the region until very recently. In 2009, the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism launched a project to preserve the village, turning it into the artistic community it is today. Now, the picturesque scenery the village provides is known to be a great place for photos, and many local and visiting Instagrammers alike come to document and share the art found all over the city.

Randomly feeling nostalgic for Spain today.

newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd
Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).

newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd

Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).

One of my favorite jokes/bits from any comedian starts at 3:27.

Terry: You have a masters in human rights from the London School of Economics?

Hari: Yeah, I wasted a lot of money before I decided to do stand-up full time, Terry. 

Hari Kondabolu (pronounced “hurry”) is going to be on the show soon! We wanted to give you a sneak peek at his stand-up. 

His new comedy album is called Waiting For 2042

“My 5-year-old insists that Bilbo Baggins is a girl.

The first time she made this claim, I protested. Part of the fun of reading to your kids, after all, is in sharing the stories you loved as a child. And in the story I knew, Bilbo was a boy. A boy hobbit. (Whatever that entails.)

But my daughter was determined. She liked the story pretty well so far, but Bilbo was definitely a girl. So would I please start reading the book the right way? I hesitated. I imagined Tolkien spinning in his grave. I imagined mean letters from his testy estate. I imagined the story getting as lost in gender distinctions as dwarves in the Mirkwood.

Then I thought: What the hell, it’s just a pronoun. My daughter wants Bilbo to be a girl, so a girl she will be. And you know what? The switch was easy. Bilbo, it turns out, makes a terrific heroine. She’s tough, resourceful, humble, funny, and uses her wits to make off with a spectacular piece of jewelry. Perhaps most importantly, she never makes an issue of her gender—and neither does anyone else.

Bilbo Baggins is a girl: Until children’s books catch up to our daughters, rewrite them. (via daxsymbiont & memymarie)